Masahiro Sakurai Compares Zelda: Breath Of The Wild And Horizon Zero Dawn

Kirby and Smash Bros. creator Masahiro Sakurai has a regular column in Japanese magazine Famitsu, and the topic of his latest entry – kindly translated by Source Gaming – is two of 2017’s biggest open-world video games: The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild and Horizon Zero Dawn.

Sakurai has clearly put a lot of hours into both titles, and feels compelled to list the many differences between them:

A week before writing this column, two wonderfully outstanding works were released and I was torn between how to spend my time. Horizon Zero Dawn (from here on out “Horizon”) and The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild (further referred to as “Zelda”). By all means, play them both because they really are masterpieces.
With that being said, I am surprised by the fact that although there are aspects that are very close, there are other aspects that are very different.

He covers points such as how climbing works in each game, how players increase their power and the contrasting visual styles of both titles. Surprisingly, he also refers to Zelda as “tiresome”, although he then quickly clarifies this statement by saying that “chores of Zelda are the most fun part” of the franchise in general. It should also be pointed out that this isn’t an official translation of Sakurai’s column, and it may be the case that something has been slightly lost in translation.

He summarises by saying that while these two games each take a slightly different approach, “both are the right answer” and once again states that players should try out both of them, because “so many well-made works lining up like this doesn’t happen often”.
Have you played both of these games? What do you make of Sakurai’s comments? As ever, we’d love to know, so why not craft your own opinion in the comment section below?

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